(UTN/UAS/ATIS) Bio-organic Processor Technology

Organic processors replicate living brains to exploit the extremely high computational throughput, dynamic self-adaption and power efficiency of neurological data processing.

(UTN/UAS/ATIS) Bio-organic Processor Technology
(UTN/UAS/ATIS) Bio-organic Processor Technology
(UTN/UAS/ATIS) Bio-organic Processor Technology
(UTN/UAS/ATIS) Bio-organic Processor Technology
(UTN/UAS/ATIS) Bio-organic Processor Technology

An organic processor based on the fundamental concept of neurological data processing, similar to that of an organic brain. The first Bio-organic Processor developed in Aquarius was known as the 'Biomatrix', a prototype, fully flexible, re-programmable super computer developed by the Eridonian Institute of For Science and Technology, on Eridonia, in 2315 A.D. Since its conception, Bio-organic processors have become standard throughout all of known space, being used for basic tasks such as personal computing devices or infotainment systems on civilian starships, to the entire super-computing grids of kilometre-long military warships designed to process unthinkably complex information of developing conflict situations in real time, such as used in the Adaptive Harmonics System.

These computers are often simply known as 'Biomatrixes' after the original prototype, which has become synonymous for any organic or semi-organic processing device in Aquarius. Modern biomatrixes employed in high-level operational use such as on warships employ multiple banks of organic processor nodes containing quintillions of nano-scale neurons suspended in a synthetic fluid-based medium. The fluid contains synthesised nutrients that maintain the organic component of the node, and regulate its temperate within predefined criteria for operation. Each of these nodes can be as small as a can of soda (330ml) for a few trillion neurons to the several dozen metres large for the most powerful systems employed on starships or super-computing installations. Each node can be reprogrammed for specific tasks on the fly and possesses a dynamic ability to learn and adapt (often referred to as 'thinking') that is inherent from the organic brain-based composition of the processor.

Such processors have orders of magnitude more computational capability than the most advanced semi-conductor based binary electronic gate arrays developed in the late twenty third century, at fractions of the power consumption. As such, since its conception in 2315 A.D, semi-conductor binary circuits were essentially entirely phased out, and are now often used for ancillary circuits requiring simple input/output responses such as integrated controllers for various starship systems. These controllers may contain trillions of transistor gates on nanofabrication technology, but are still limited to the scope of the binary logic upon which they are built.